Human diseases are exceptionally complex. Consider various forms of cancer, heart disease, diabetes, atherosclerosis, diseases of immunity, genetic diseases, infectious diseases, and many others. The causes of these disease processes are equally complex and almost always multifactorial, with contributions from the host/patient (related to genetics or physiology), various exposures to disease agents, factors from the environment, and many more. The patients themselves are complex and so the presentation, consequences, and severity of disease have a tendency to vary tremendously among an affected cohort. Despite recognition of these complexities associated with human disease, researchers have historically taken reductionists approaches to their study. Hence, our knowledge of many diseases reflect the combination of results (and inferences) from ex vivo approaches, in vitro cell culture, model systems, and examination of limited numbers of molecular mediators of disease. It has been recognized for many years that the complete understanding of any disease process will require the ability to examine the condition in the context of the patient, without elimination of the complexities of the in vivo condition. Welcome to the world of systems biology and network science!

Trainee Travel Awards

ASIP Trainee Travel Awards Marina Anastasiou, MScTufts University School of Medicineo Trevor Darby, PhD, MScEmory University Kelsey Hirschi, BSBrigham Young University Lindsey Kennedy, BSTAMU HSC Benoit Niclou, BABoston Children's Hospital Morgan Preziosi, BS, BAUniversity of Pennsylvania Sarah HoskingUniversity of Pittsburgh Prarthana Dalal, BANorthwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Paul Hanson, BScUniversity of British Columbia Matthias [...]

Pilar Alcaide, PhD

As a PhD-trained veterinary pathologist, my interests lie in the intersection of discovery, translational, and clinical research. I study comparative oncology, meaning cancers that occur in both animals and people. The old saying, “people resemble their pets” is quite true. One cancer that is quite similar in both dogs and people is lymphoma. Lymphoma, a cancer of immune cells in the blood, is a “liquid tumor” that can affect every organ in the body. Precisely how lymphoma picks which organs to invade has stumped physicians and scientists for decades.

George Blackburn and Zach Swan

Dr. Traci Parry (Assistant Professor, Department of Kinesiology, University of North Carolina, Greensboro) is hosting two undergraduate students in her laboratory during summer 2019 as part of the ASIP Summer Research Opportunity in Pathology Program. Zach Swan is a senior at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and George Blackburn is a junior at [...]

Rachel Porter

Rachel Porter is a senior at the University of St. Mary in Kansas City, KS. Rachel is spending summer 2019 participating in the ASIP Summer Research Opportunity in Pathology Program and the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) program of the Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutics at the Kansas University Medical Center working in the [...]