#PISA2020 Day 5

#PISA2020 Day 5

Trainee Advising SessionRichard N. Mitchell, MD, PhD * Brigham & Women’s HospitalWhat’s up with an MD/PhD and Am I Competitive?Individuals with both MD and P…

Program

Yesterday was another full day of science, mentoring, and networking at PISA 2020. With Day 4 of the meeting in the books, we find ourselves at Day 5 – the final day of PISA 2020.

TODAY at PISA 2020, we begin with Trainee Advising Sessions at 8:00 AM and 9:00 AM on the topics of “What’s up with an MD/PhD and am I competitive?” and “How to get the most from mentoring relationships.” These sessions will be followed at 10:00 AM with a special Panel Discussion – COVID-19 Updates from Frontline Experts, featuring six experts who are working in various areas of COVID-19 from molecular and serological testing to convalescent plasma therapy to autopsy findings in COVID-19 patients. There is no lunch session today, so plan to visit the ePosters. The afternoon scientific program begins at 1:00 PM with a Plenary Session on “Architectural models of disease: Rendering complexity on a small scale,” followed by concurrent symposia on “Host-microbial interactions at the mucosal surfaces” and “Lymphatic biology, obesity, and beyond.” The scientific program will end at 5:00 PM.

Additional on-demand content has now been posted on the Confex meeting website. If you missed a session, be sure to go back and watch.

The meeting will close out with a brief closing session at 5:00 PM.

We hope you have enjoyed the meeting and we look forward to getting your feedback after the meeting concludes. A meeting evaluation will be sent to all attendees within a few days.

Pathologists Fighting COVID-19 – Sally Davis

K-State Assistant Professor of Experimental Pathology, Dr. A. Sally Davis, an ASIP member and HCS Councilor, will lead USDA-National Institute of Food and Agriculture Rapid Response project “Translating SARS-CoV-2 Research Into Practical Solutions For The Meat And Poultry Processing Industry” to find scientific solutions to protect meat and poultry plant workers and their surrounding communities from the spread of COVID-19.

The research will focus on analysis of the presence and longevity of infectious SARS-CoV-2 on a variety of surfaces under industry realistic environmental conditions, analyze efficacy of current sanitation and disinfection approaches and where needed development of new strategies and guidelines. This transdisciplinary research project will merge virology, applied food science research and extension approaches, as well as applied mathematics risk assessment techniques in order to specifically address the needs of the meat and poultry industry while filling gaps in our broader knowledge about the virus. Read More below:

Kansas State University

Monday, Sept. 14, 2020 Kansas State University researchers involved in a U.S. Department of Agriculture-funded project to protect meat plant workers and their surrounding communities from the spread of COVID-19. From left: Randy Phebus, Sally Davis, Valentina Trinetta, Sara Gragg and Daniel Vega. Not pictured are Jeanette Thurston, Erin Schirtzinger and Yunjeong Kim.

USDA-NIFA Grants Nearly $14 Million for Rapid Response to Help U.S. Universities Find Scientific Solutions Amid Pandemic

KANSAS CITY, MO, September 9, 2020 – To keep science discovery, innovation, and education moving forward, USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA-NIFA) developed a series of COVID-19 Rapid Response funding opportunities targeted to the most critical issues facing university researchers, small businesses and consumers across America during the pandemic.

Using this time to focus on career development

The pandemic is a great time to focus on career development and goals! While there are various factors outside our control at the moment, including publishing, the rate at which labs can reopen, and grants, there is plenty we can do to further ourselves in our career. Explore different options within academia, industry, policy, consulting, writing, etc that you have casually thought about but never had the chance to look into. (If you’re interested in scientific communications or writing, you can help write for this blog!) Furthermore, continue to boost your CV by participating on committees, councils, and organizations within your university and elsewhere (hint hint, ASIP!). There are also ways to boost your network during the pandemic, as discussed here. Furthermore, ASIP offers virtual hangout sessions, where trainees from across the country can interact, form relationships, and discuss common questions, struggles, and anything else.

The bottom line is, while bench work may be slow, resulting in fewer manuscripts and grants, there are things we can still do to remain productive and advance our career. If you have any ideas, questions, or want to get involved, email Morgan at mpreziosi91@gmail.com.

Mouse Models Reveal Role of T-Cytotoxic and T-Reg Cells in Immune Response to Influenza: Implications for Vaccine Design

Article of Interest:

Stewart Sell

Abstract: Immunopathologic examination of the lungs of mouse models of experimental influenza virus infection provides new insights into the immune response in this disease. First, there is rapidly developing perivascular and peribronchial infiltration of the lung with T-cells. This is followed by invasion of T-cells into the bronchiolar epithelium, and separation of epithelial cells from each other and from the basement membrane leading to defoliation of the bronchial epithelium. The intraepithelial reaction may involve either CD8 or CD4 T-cytotoxic cells and is analogous to a viral exanthema of the skin, such as measles and smallpox, which occur when the immune response against these infections is activated and the infected cells are attacked by T-cytotoxic cells. Then there is formation of B-cell follicles adjacent to bronchi, i.e., induced bronchial associated lymphoid tissue (iBALT). iBALT reacts like the cortex of a lymph node and is a site for a local immune response not only to the original viral infection, but also related viral infections (heterologous immunity). Proliferation of Type II pneumocytes and/or terminal bronchial epithelial cells may extend into the adjacent lung leading to large zones filled with tumor-like epithelial cells. The effective killing of influenza virus infected epithelial cells by T-cytotoxic cells and induction of iBALT suggests that adding the induction of these components might greatly increase the efficacy of influenza vaccination.

Sharing large-scale patient data to understand COVID-19 severity

HCS and ASIP member Dr. Alejandro Adam recently co-authored two preprints with collaborators at Albany Medical College, the University of Wisconsin, Madison and the Morgridge Institute for Research. This research, led by Drs. Ariel Jaitovich (Albany Med) and Joshua Coon (UW-Madison), shows how multiplexed measurements, large-scale multi-omics analysis and artificial intelligence can shed light into why some patients quickly recover, while others have a much worse prognosis. The data shows high levels of CCL19, but low levels of PDGF-AA, dysregulation of platelet function, blood coagulation, acute phase response, and endotheliopathy in patients with worse prognosis, providing insight into novel potential therapeutic interventions. All cytokine profiling, metabolomics, lipidomics, proteomics, transcriptomics from a prospective cohort of 120 patients were made freely available to the whole scientific community.

More info:

https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.05.21.20051300v2
https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.07.17.20156513v1
https://covid-omics.app


  • ASIP Member Dr. James Musser featured for COVID-19 Research

    James Musser, MD, spoke with The New York Times about how COVID-19’s genetic code plays a vital role in controlling the virus.

    Since last March, a team of researchers led by Dr. James Musser, chair of the department of pathology and genomic medicine at Houston Methodist Hospital, have been sequencing the viral genomes drawn from patients — 20,000 genomes so far. This new study has found that every coronavirus variant of concern to researchers around the world has been circulating in Houston at a low level for at least six to eight weeks. Houston is the first U.S. city to find all of the variants, including those recently reported in California and New York and the ones found in Brazil, Britain and South Africa.

  • #PISA2020 Day 5
    Program Yesterday was another full day of science, mentoring, and networking at PISA 2020. With Day 4 of the meeting in the books, we find ourselves at Day 5 – the final day of PISA 2020. TODAY at PISA 2020, we begin with Trainee Advising Sessions at 8:00 AM and 9:00 AM on the topics […]
  • Pathologists Fighting COVID-19 – Sally Davis
    K-State Assistant Professor of Experimental Pathology, Dr. A. Sally Davis, an ASIP member and HCS Councilor, will lead USDA-National Institute of Food and Agriculture Rapid Response project “Translating SARS-CoV-2 Research Into Practical Solutions For The Meat And Poultry Processing Industry” to find scientific solutions to protect meat and poultry plant workers and their surrounding communities […]