#PISA2020 Day 3

Yesterday was a very full day at PISA 2020 with sessions and events spanning from 9:00 AM until 7:30 PM.

Today at PISA 2020, we begin the morning with Trainee Advising Sessions at 8:00 AM and 9:00 AM on the topics of “Considering medical school?” and “ Individual development plans (IDPs) for trainees: Your plan for success.” At 10:00 AM, we will have two concurrent Meet-the-Expert session. The Breast Cancer Scientific Interest Group is hosting a session featuring the Outstanding Investigator Award Lecture on the topic of “Understanding breast cancer: My journey as a physician-scientist.” During the same time slot, the Liver Pathobiology Scientific Interest Group will host a Meet-the-Expert session feature two talks on “NAFLD: Cellular and molecular basis and therapies” and “Liver homeostasis, zonation, and repair.” There will be a long break for lunch today, followed by the afternoon scientific program beginning at 1:00 PM. Today’s Plenary Session is on the topic of “Bench to bedside: NOT lost in translation.” At 3:00 PM, we will have concurrent symposia on the topics of “Not a monolithic disease: Cancer heterogeneity and precision oncology” and “And the beat goes on: New wrinkles in cardiovascular pathophysiology.” The scientific program concludes at 5:00 PM, but the day will not yet be over. At 6:00 PM, there will be a special session organized by a subcommittee from the Committee for Career Development and Diversity on “Navigating the Socialsphere: A how-to guide to promoting your scientific career online.”

It’s going to be a great day at PISA 2020. See you there!

#PISA2020 Day 3

The PISA 2020 theme is: Pathobiology that Drives Discovery, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Human Diseases: Present and Future. The program features plenary sess…

PROGRAM

Navigating the Socialsphere: A How-to Guide for Promoting Your Scientific Career Online

Want to try a tweet?

Click the twitter button below and insert your information where there are (parenthesis)

I’m learning to navigate the #Socialsphere by attending the @ASIPath #SocialMedia Workshop for Scientists! It’s a guide for promoting your #scientific #career online! Want to come? Register here: https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJUkde-vqzMtH9UlBdDHSVhYOjBOCEZtC8oR #ASIPVirtual


Links and Resources for Scientists interested in using Twitter more!

  • You should get Twitter…for science!

You should get Twitter…for science!

The phrase “Hi, we know each other from the internet!” might have been something weird to say a decade ago, but now it’s one of my favorite icebreakers for meeting people in astronomy. The first time someone said this to me, I felt a wave of joy and excitement, realizing that I had made a real connection through my time on Twitter.

  • How to Use Twitter as a Scientist

How to Use Twitter as a Scientist

Those of you who not only read my blog, but follow my through other channels, might know that I’m quite active on Twitter. I joined Twitter in Spring 2010, and I’ve been enjoying it ever since. Quite some time ago, I wrote a post with my favorite tweeps.

  • Our Year on Twitter: Science in #SocialMedia (Trends in Immunology journal)
  • How to Make Twitter Work for You (and for Science)

Post Page

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  • But I’ve never Tweeted!

But I’ve never tweeted!

Attending a conference and want to participate, but you don’t know what to say? Here’s your guide for 1st time social media-ites! We are breaking down the hashtags to help you begin your social adventure.

  • Promote Your Journal using Social Media

Promote your journal using social media | Editor Resources

Social media is an amazing tool for journal editors. Many editors are already are using Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn to create an online community for their journals. This, in turn, is providing them with an ideal platform to raise the profile of their journal and promote their content.

  • Early Career Research Toolbox: Social Media for Scientists

Early Career Researcher Toolbox: Social Media for Scientists

Before I started writing for the Addgene blog, sharing Chemistry Cat memes was how I used social media as a scientist. I mean, I had a LinkedIn page and a Twitter handle, but I wasn’t using them to my professional advantage.

  • Social Media Guide for Journal Editors

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Tomorrow Life

Where human stories shape the future

ASIPathways links accompanying these resources

(and more)

●      “Write the Tweet you need in Academia”

Write the Tweet You Need in Academia

●      Navigating the Socialsphere: A How-to Guide for Promoting Your Scientific Career Online. Want to try a tweet?

Navigating the Socialsphere: A How-to Guide for Promoting Your Scientific Career Online


By the end of the session you will learn:
• how to tweet
• how to promote your science
• best practices

Registration is free!
Participants can submit questions and comments now or during the live event.

Daisy Shu, PhD
Postdoctoral Fellow
Schepens Eye Research Institute of Mass Eye and Ear,
Harvard Medical School
@EyeDaisyShu


Eric Perkins, PhD
Director of Product Management
Addgene
@AllostEricSite


Samira Kiani, MD
Associate Professor
University of Pittsburgh
@samira_kiani1

Don’t miss this interactive webinar!
Send us your questions and twitter handle before the webinar!

Wednesday, November 11, 2020 6PM EST

Click to Tweet before the session!

I’m a (insert role) at (tag institute you work for) studying (insert your field of research) Follow me! @ASIPath Social Media Workshop for Scientists #ASIPSocial #ASIPVirtual Navigating the Socialsphere: A How-to Guide for Promoting Your Scientific Career Online https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJUkde-vqzMtH9UlBdDHSVhYOjBOCEZtC8oR


We will provide more sample tweets after registration!


Sponsored by the ASIP Committee for Career Development and Diversity

Organizers:

Andrew W. Duncan, PhD
@DuncanWAndrew
University of Pittsburgh


Daisy Shu, PhD
@EyeDaisyShu
Harvard University


Chad Walesky, PhD
@ChadWaleskyPhD
Harvard University


Francisco Carrillo-Salinas, PhD
@FranCarrilloPhD
Tufts University


Marina Anastasiou, BS
@emmy_a_
Tufts University


Gina LaBorde
@GinaLaBorde1
ASIP

Tweet us your Questions!

Promote Yourself and Your Science on Social Media Free Session!

Want to try a tweet?

Click the twitter button below and insert your information where there are (parenthesis)

Hi, I’m (insert name) and I’m a (insert role) at (tag institute or work) doing (insert your field of research) I’m attending the @ASIPath Social Media Workshop for Scientists #ASIPSocial #ASIPVirtual Want to come? Register here: https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMsfuqhqjgrHtSGPjO6VZyjBK8EKeJioyt4

Promote Yourself and Your Science on Social Media

By the end of the session you will learn:* how to tweet* how to promote your science* how to become a storytellerRegistration is free!Participants can submit…


By the end of the session you will learn:
• how to tweet
• how to promote your science
• how to become a storyteller

Registration is free!
Participants can submit questions and comments now or during the live event.

Daisy Shu, PhD
Postdoctoral Fellow
Harvard University
@EyeDaisyShu


Eric Perkins, PhD
Director of Product Management
Addgene
@AllostEricSite


Samira Kiani, MD
Associate Professor
University of Pittsburgh
@samira_kiani1

Don’t miss this interactive webinar!
Send us your questions and twitter handle before the webinar!

Tuesday, September 15, 2020 EST
4:00 pm

Click to Tweet before the session!

Hi, I’m (insert name) and I’m a (insert role) at (tag institute you work for) studying (insert your field of research) Follow me @(insert Twitter handle) on (insert social media platforms that you have) @ASIPath Social Media Workshop for Scientists #ASIPSocial #ASIPVirtual https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMsfuqhqjgrHtSGPjO6VZyjBK8E


We will provide more sample tweets after registration!


Sponsored by the ASIP Committee for Career Development and Diversity

Organizers:

Andrew W. Duncan, PhD
University of Pittsburgh


Daisy Shu, PhD
Harvard University


Chad Walesky, PhD
Harvard University


Gina LaBorde
ASIP

Thank You for Your Service to the ASIP!

The American Society for Investigative Pathology is an organization that relies upon actively engaged volunteers and elected leaders to effectively accomplish its mission, goals, and objectives. Newly elected leaders and volunteers began new terms of service on July 1. We sincerely thank the following individuals for their service to the Society over the last few years:

Asma Nusrat, MD

Dr. Nusrat just completed her term as immediate Past President and has rotated off the ASIP Council after many years of service. She previously served as President (2018-2019), President-elect (2017-2018), and Vice President (2016-2017). Dr. Nusrat is a newly elected member of the Nominating Committee and is continuing in the leadership of the Vascular and Mucosal Pathobiology (VAMP) Scientific Interest Group. Dr. Nusrat is also a member of the Editorial Board for The American Journal of Pathology.


Monte Willis, MD, PhD

Dr. Willis just completed his term as Councilor At-large and has rotated off of the ASIP Council after many years of service. Dr. Willis previously Chaired both the Education Committee and the Committee for Career Development and Diversity. He currently serves as the ASIP representative to the FASEB Finance Committee. Dr. Willis is also a member of the Editorial Board for The American Journal of Pathology.


Diane Bielenberg, PhD

Dr. Bielenberg just completed a 3-year term as Education Committee Chair and as a member of the ASIP Council. Dr. Bielenberg continues to serve as a member of the Education Committee and the Committee for Career Development and Diversity, and is a co-organizer of the PISA2020 meeting .


Cecelia Yates, PhD

Cecelia Yates

Dr. Yates has just completed her second 3-year term as Chair of the Committee for Career Development and Diversity. Dr. Yates will continue to serve on the ASIP Council in the role of Councilor At-large, and as a member of the Research and Science Policy Committee and the Membership Committee. Dr. Yates is also a member of the Editorial Board for The American Journal of Pathology.


Jose Otero, MD, PhD

Dr. Otero is rotating off of the Education Committee and the Program Committee after several years of service to each. Dr. Otero will continue as a co-leader of the Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cells Scientific Interest Group.


David Williams, MD, PhD

Dr. Williams just completed a 2-year term as Program Committee Chair and served for one year prior to that as Program Committee Chair-elect. Dr. Williams has also rolled off the ASIP Council after three years of service. As Chair of the Program Committee, Dr. Williams also sat on the Education Committee and the Committee for Career Development and Diversity. Dr. Williams will continue to contribute the Program Committee as one of the co-leaders of the Gene Expression Scientific Interest Group, and he recently became the ASIP representative to the FASEB Scientific Research Conferences (SRC) Committee.


William A. Muller MD, PhD

Dr. Muller is rotating away from Chair of the Research and Science Policy Committee as he assumes the responsibilities associated with being the current Vice President. However, Dr. Muller plans to remain on the Research and Science Policy Committee. He will also continue to serve on the ASIP Council in his new role as Vice President and Chair of the Membership Committee.


Tanya Mayadas, PhD

Dr. Mayadas just completed a 3-year term on the Nominating Committee. Dr. Mayadas has previously served on the Program Committee, and continues to be a contributor to the ASIP scientific meetings.


Linda McManus, PhD

Dr. McManus just completed a 3-year term on the Nominating Committee. Dr. McManus is a Past President and previously served on the ASIP Council for many years. She will continue to serve as a member of the Research and Science Policy Committee, and as one of the founding co-leaders of Women in Pathology.


Martha Furie, PhD

Dr. Furie just completed a 3-year term on the Meritorious Awards Committee, and several years of service to the Membership Committee. Dr. Furie is a Past President and Past Program Committee Chair. Dr. Furie is also the current Editor-in-Chief of The American Journal of Pathology and continues to serve on the ASIP Council.


Meera Hameed, MD

Dr. Hameed just completed a 3-year term on the Meritorious Awards Committee. Dr. Hameed currently serves as an Associate Editor for The American Journal of Pathology.


Pilar Alcaide, PhD

Dr. Alcaide has rolled off the Program Committee after several years of service. Dr. Alcaide continues to serve on the ASIP Council as a Councilor At-large and is a co-leader of Women in Pathology.


Nate Montgomery, MD, PhD

Dr. Montgomery has rolled off the Program Committee after several years of service. Dr. Montgomery will continue to contribute to the ASIP scientific meetings on an ad hoc basis over the coming years.


George K. Michalopoulos, MD, PhD

Dr. Michalopoulos has completed several years of service to the Research and Science Policy Committee. He is a Past President and previously served on the ASIP Council for many years.


Roberto Mota Alvidrez, MD, PhD

Dr. Alvidrez has rotated off the Education Committee after several years of service, and has joined the Research and Science Policy Committee. He will also continue to serve on the Committee for Career Development and Diversity. Dr. Alvidrez will also continue to serve as a co-organizer of the newly established Trainee Virtual Hangout events.


Jeffrey Golden, MD

Dr. Golden served as the Association of Pathology Chairs (APC) representative to the Education Committee for several years and is rotating off to assume greater leadership positions with the APC. Dr. Golden is also a member of the Editorial Board for The American Journal of Pathology.


Michael Thompson, MD, PhD

Dr. Thompson is rotating off the Education Committee after several years of service to that group. He will remain engaged in Society functions as a newly appointed member of the Program Committee.


Paul Monga, MD

Dr. Monga has recently completed his time as the ASIP representative to the FASEB Finance Committee. He continues to serve as Secretary-Treasurer, as a member of Council, and as a co-leader of the Liver Pathobiology Scientific Interest Group. As a SIG leader, he contributes to the development of the ASIP scientific meetings. Dr. Monga is also an Associate Editor for The American Journal of Pathology.


Kevin Gardner, MD, PhD

Dr. Gardner recently completed his term as ASIP representative to the FASEB Science Research Conferences (SRC) Committee. Dr. Gardner will continue as a member of the Program Committee, as co-leader of the Neoplasia and Growth Regulation Scientific Interest Group. Dr. Gardner is also a member of the Editorial Board for The American Journal of Pathology.


Dan Remick, MD

Dr. Remick has rotated off of the Membership Committee after several years of service. Dr. Remick is a Past President and continues to serve as a member of the Research and Science Policy Committee. Dr. Remick is also a member of the Editorial Board for The American Journal of Pathology.


Dani Zander, MD

Dr. Zander recently completed a term on the Membership Committee. Dr. Zander is a Past President and will continue to sit on the ASIP Council in her role as immediate Past President. In addition, Dr. Zander continues to serve as a co-leader for the Pulmonary Pathobiology Scientific Interest Group. Dr. Zander is also a member of the Editorial Board for The American Journal of Pathology.

A Tribute to Marilyn Gist Farquhar (1928-2019)

Personal Comments
Dorothy Ford Bainton, MD
Former Vice Chancellor, UCSF

Dorothy Ford Bainton, MD

Although Marilyn Farquhar’s scientific productivity is well documented in 319 publications, perhaps her pathway is less well known. She was raised on a farm, as a 3rd generation Californian, in Tulare, CA. After graduation from UCB (1952) and 2 years of medical school (UCSF), she began her scientific career by working toward a PhD in Experimental Pathology. She made this change because her husband, Dr. John Farquhar, discouraged her from taking the clinical years of medical school. Luckily for her, the chairman of Pathology had just purchased a new RCA 3B electron microscope and asked her to investigate how to prepare tissue for analysis.

Her thesis project was to characterize the electron microscopic changes during hormone secretion in the anterior pituitary of the rat. She used the approach of an experimental endocrinologist, target organ ablation and hormone replacement. When her husband continued his training at the University of Minnesota, she followed and was fortunate to work with Robert Good and Robert Vernier. With them she made the first EM studies of renal biopsies. Her husband next traveled to NYC for further training. She was accepted as a post-doctoral trainee in the laboratory of George Palade at Rockefeller University (1958-1962). Having virtually worked alone as a graduate student, she then began her formal training in the new field of cell biology, in its “birthplace,” the Rockefeller. It is of interest that Palade’s doctoral thesis in anatomy in Romania was on “The Urinary Tubule of the Dolphin” collected from the Black Sea. Years later, these early pituitary and renal studies led to extensive studies of autophagy in the pituitary, named crinophagy by DeDuve, and “tight junctions,” with Palade.

After the birth of two sons, she again followed her husband back to California and joined the Pathology faculty at USCF (1962-1970). She then directed her own laboratory while training graduate and post-doctoral fellows. (I was her first post-doctoral fellow from 1963-1969). In 1969 she returned to the Rockefeller as a full Professor and joined the Palade-Siekevitz group. In 1970, she and Palade were married. From that time on Farquhar and Palade frequently collaborated, where there was mutual interest, but they maintained separate labs and separate programs throughout their entire careers at the Rockefeller, Yale, and UCSD universities.

One pauses here to reflect on the peripatetic pathway to education that was common for talented women at that time, i.e. follow your husband, have children, keep working with all the compromising that ensues. Despite all these changes, Marilyn had the brilliance and persistence to make the most of every physical change. In addition, she was a wonderful role model for young women attempting to break into a man’s world. She advised women to follow their scientific interests with passion and persistence. She also broke with tradition and showed young women how they could have both a family with children, and a scientific career. It would take negotiating with superiors for reduced time when children were very young and returning to a more active schedule as children became more self-sufficient. Her own career proved the value of such a time investment by her superiors and to her in the supervision of her own trainees. Over her long career she helped guide the evolution of the fields of cell biology and experimental pathology. She tutored 64 trainees, many of whom were women. She will be greatly missed.