Dr. J. Charles Jennette Receives the Distinguished Service Award from the Association of Pathology Chairs

J. Charles Jennette, MD, the Kenneth M. Brinkhous Distinguished Professor and immediate past Chair of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine received the 2019 Distinguished Service Award from the Association of Pathology Chairs (APC) at their Annual Meeting in Boston, MA, in July 2019. The APC Distinguished Service [...]

Women in Pathology

Women in Pathology is a new community within the membership of the American Society for Investigative Pathology (ASIP) that is focused on issues that face women in science, and is committed to recognizing women's scientific achievements and fostering their career development and advancement in pathobiology research. Women in Pathology will address challenges for women in [...]

Dr. Michael Schnoor receives the Dolph O. Adams Award

Dr. Michael Schnoor, PhD MSc Professor for Molecular Biomedicine "Royal Society-Newton Advanced Fellow" CINVESTAV del IPN San Pedro Zacatenco, GAM Michael Schnoor is a long-standing ASIP member and actively involved in the Vascular and Mucosal Pathobiology (VAMP) Scientific Interest Group (SIG). He received his PhD from the University of Münster, Germany; and completed postdoctoral fellowships [...]

David Sullivan

Trailblazing Men ASIP Highlights Session: I Am An ASIP Member and This Is My Science Experimental Biology 2019 – Orlando FL David Sullivan, PhD Research Assistant Professor Northwestern University Feinburg School of MedicineChicago, IL Sometimes those tacky quotes on motivational posters have a bit of truth in them. That one about journey being more important [...]

Human diseases are exceptionally complex. Consider various forms of cancer, heart disease, diabetes, atherosclerosis, diseases of immunity, genetic diseases, infectious diseases, and many others. The causes of these disease processes are equally complex and almost always multifactorial, with contributions from the host/patient (related to genetics or physiology), various exposures to disease agents, factors from the environment, and many more. The patients themselves are complex and so the presentation, consequences, and severity of disease have a tendency to vary tremendously among an affected cohort. Despite recognition of these complexities associated with human disease, researchers have historically taken reductionists approaches to their study. Hence, our knowledge of many diseases reflect the combination of results (and inferences) from ex vivo approaches, in vitro cell culture, model systems, and examination of limited numbers of molecular mediators of disease. It has been recognized for many years that the complete understanding of any disease process will require the ability to examine the condition in the context of the patient, without elimination of the complexities of the in vivo condition. Welcome to the world of systems biology and network science!